8/27
WEB du Bois, Alice Coltrane and Robert Lee Vann

 

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10/20

1893 – Kenya’s first president Jomo Kenyatta was born

1934 - Henry Dumas is born in Sweet Home, Arkansas. He will move
       to the village of Harlem in New York City at the age of
       ten. He will attend City College and then join the Air
       Force.  While in the Air Force he will spend a year on
       the Arabian Peninsula, where he will develop an interest
       in the Arabic language, mythology, and culture. He will
       be active in civil rights and humanitarian activities,
       including transporting food and clothing to protesters
       living in Mississippi and Tennessee. In 1967, he will
       work at Southern Illinois University as a teacher,
       counselor, and director of language workshops in its
       "Experiment in Higher Education" program. It is there
       where he meets Eugene Redmond, a fellow teacher in that
       program. He and Redmond will read their poetry at common
       gatherings; Redmond especially remembers him reading "Our
       King Is Dead," his elegy for Martin Luther King, Jr. He
       will also frequent the offices of the East St. Louis
       Monitor, which Redmond edits. He will inspire interest
       for his unique vision of black people in the diaspora.
       In many ways he will become a cultural icon in African
       American literary circles. He will claim Moms Mabley and
       gospel music as particular influences upon him. He will
       join the ancestors on May 23, 1968 at the age of 33 after
       being mistakenly shot and killed by a New York City
       Transit policeman. Over the course of the ten months that
       he lives in East St. Louis, he and Redmond will forge the
       collaborative relationship that would prove so fruitful
       to his posthumous Career. His literary legacy is kept
       alive almost single-handedly by Redmond.  His first
       collection of short fiction is entitled "Arks of Bones
       and Other Stories" (edited by Redmond in 1974), which
       includes nine stories and in which his largely mythic
       vision of African American existence is apparent.
       Redmond's commitment to making his work readily available
       to scholarly communities will continue in the publication
       of "Goodbye, Sweetwater" (1988) and "Knees of a Natural
       Man: The Selected Poetry of Henry Dumas" (1989). The
       first volume contains eight of the stories that first
       appeared in "Ark of Bones," along with excerpts from
       Dumas's unfinished novel, "Jonoah and the Green Stone"
       (1976), stories from "Rope of Wind" (1979), and three
       selections from "Goodbye Sweetwater." One of the stories
       in the final section is "Rain God," which develops the
       African American folk belief that, when it is raining and
       the sun is shining, the devil is beating his wife. Three
       young black boys literally witness this phenomenon as
       they are on their way home one rainy-sunny day. The
       second volume contains previously published as well as
       unpublished poems, including several poems with the title
       "Kef" and an accompanying number, and "Saba," with the
       same pattern. Some of the poems in "Knees" had appeared
       in "Play Ebony: Play Ivory" (1974), a collection of his
       poetry, which Redmond will edit singly in 1974 and which
       he co-edits in 1970. His poetry is inspired by African
       American music, particularly blues and jazz (he studied
       with Sun Ra), and he develops themes consistent with the
       Black Aesthetic of the 1960s. His poetry also focuses,
       in keeping with his fiction, on themes of nature and the
       natural world.

1953 – Jomo Kenyatta and five other Mau Mau leaders refuse to appeal their prison terms

1954 - Freeman Bosley, Jr., St. Louis' first African American
       mayor, is born in St. Louis, Missouri. He will attend
       Saint Louis University and Saint Louis University Law
       School. He will graduate from Saint Louis University in
       1976 with two undergraduate degrees, a B.A. in Urban
       Affairs and a B.A. in Political Science. He will receive
       his Juris Doctorate from Saint Louis University Law
       School in 1979. His public service career will begin
       when he becomes the first African American St. Louis
       Circuit Clerk for the 22nd Judicial Circuit - a position
       he will hold for ten years. He will serve as the 3rd
       Ward Democratic Committeeman, chairman of the St. Louis
       City Democratic Central Association, and the first
       African American chairman of the Democratic Party in St.
       Louis City. After winning the April 6, 1993 election
       with 66.5% of the vote, he will become the first African
       American Mayor of St. Louis. He will oversee the battle
       against the Flood of 1993, help to orchestrate the $70
       million bailout of Trans World Airlines and help to move
       the Los Angeles Rams football team to St. Louis from
       Anaheim, California. He will be defeated in his bid for
       re-election.

1967 - The first National Conference of Black Power opens in
       Newark, New Jersey.  The four-day meeting is attended
       by 1,100 African Americans.

1967 - A night of racially motivated disturbances occurs in
       Memphis, Tennessee.

1973 - The National Black Network begins operations.  It is the
       first African American owned and operated radio news
       network.

10/23

1815 - Henry Highland Garnet is born in New Market, Maryland.
       He will become a noted clergyman and abolitionist.  He
       will also be the first African American to deliver a
       sermon before the House of Representatives.

1863 - Robert Blake, powder boy aboard the USS Marblehead, is
       the first African American to be awarded the Naval Medal
       of Honor "for conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary
       heroism, and intrepidity at the risk of his own life."
       The heroic action occurred during a victorious battle
       off the coast of South Carolina.

1867 – Business woman Sarah Breedlove aka Madam CJ Walker, arguably the first self made woman millionaire of any race in America and first black millionaire was born in Delta, LA. She invented and marketed Black hair care products. Contrary to popular belief, Walker never sold skin lightening products is born in Delta, Louisiana. Her hair-care, toiletry and cosmetics products revolutionized the standard of
beauty for African American women.  Her philanthropy and generosity made her a popular figure in the early 1900's. She started her business in Denver, CO which altered curling irons that were popularized by the French to suit the texture of Black womens hair.

1908 – Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. was born

1919 - Alice H. Parker patents the gas heating furnace.

1935 - Esther Mae Jones is born in Galveston, Texas.  She will
       begin her career as a blues singer at 13 as "Little"
       Esther Phillips, taking her name from a billboard for a
       gasoline company. Problems with drugs and alcohol will
       cause her to interrupt her career a number of times.
       She will record several memorable songs including "And
       I Love Him" and "Release Me."

1946 - The University of Tennessee refuses to play Duquesne
       University, because they may use an African American
       player in their basketball game.

1999 - President Clinton pardons Freddie Meeks, an African
       American sailor court-martialed for mutiny during World
       War II when he and other sailors refused to load live
       ammunition following a deadly explosion at the Port
       Chicago Naval Magazine near San Francisco that had
       claimed more than 300 lives.

2006 - DJ Carl Blaze died from multiple gunshot wounds on this day in 2006 , 2 weeks after being shot a dozen times outside a friend’s home in Manhattan , New York. Blaze , a fixture on New York’s Power 105.1 fm station , was born Carlos Rivera and was the apparent victim of a robbery.

 

Ourstory 12/25

1760 - Jupiter Hammon, a New York slave who was probably the
first African American poet, publishes "An Evening
Thought:Salvation by Christ".

1776 - Oliver Cromwell and Prince Whipple are among soldiers who
cross the Delaware River with George Washington to
successfully attack the Hessians in Trenton, New Jersey,
during the Revolutionary War.

1807 - Charles B. Ray is born in Falmouth, Massachusetts. He
will enter Wesleyan University in Connecticut and be
forced to withdraw due to objections from northerners
and southerners. He will later become a prominent
African American leader.

1837 - Cheyney University is established in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania. It will be first known as the "Institute
for Colored Youth". The school will be moved to George
Cheyney's farm, 24 miles west of Philadelphia, in 1902.
It will be renamed in 1913 to "The Cheyney Training
School for Teachers." Cheyney University of Pennsylvania
is the first historically Black institution of learning
in America. It is also the first college in the United
States to receive official state certification as an
institution of higher academic education for African
Americans.

1837 - Charles Lenox Remond begins his career as an antislavery
agent. Remond will be one of the first African Americans
employed as a lecturer by the antislavery movement. He
will work many years for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery
Society.

1865 - Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia, Shaw University
in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Virginia Union University
in Richmond, Virginia are founded.

1875 - Charles Caldwell joins the ancestors after being
assassinated in Clinton, Mississippi. He was the first
African American in the state of Mississippi to be accused
of the murder of a white man and found "not guilty" by an
all-white jury. He was later elected to the state senate.

1907 - Cabell "Cab" Calloway III is born in Rochester, New York. A
versatile jazz bandleader and singer who will popularize
scat singing, his song "Minnie the Moocher" will be the
first million-selling jazz record. Calloway will also
appear in the movie "Porgy and Bess" as well as perform as
a singer in the touring companies of "Porgy" and "Hello
Dolly." He will join the ancestors on November 18, 1994.

1951 - Harry T. Moore, a Florida NAACP official, joins the
ancestors after being killed by a bomb in his home in Mims,
Florida. Active in expanding the African American vote in
Florida and in desegregating the University of Florida,
Moore will be posthumously awarded the NAACP's Spingarn
Medal in 1952.

1951 - The NAACP's Spingarn Medal is presented to Mabel K. Staupers
for her leadership in the field of nursing.

1956 - The home of Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth, a Birmingham,
Alabama protest leader, is destroyed by a dynamite bomb.

1959 - Michael P. Anderson is born in Plattsburgh, New York. He
will be raised in Spokane, Washington. He will graduate
from the University of Washington in 1981 and be
commissioned a second lieutenant in the USAF. He will
become Chief of Communication Maintenance for the 2015
Communication Squadron and later be Director of
Information System Maintenance for the 1920 Information
System Group. In 1986 he will be selected to attend
Undergraduate Pilot Training at Vance AFB, Oklahoma. He
will serve as an aircraft commander and instructor pilot
in the 920th Air Refueling Squadron, Wurtsmith AFB
Michigan. He will be selected as an astronaut by NASA in
December 1994, and will become qualified for flight crew
assignment as a mission specialist. He will be initially
assigned technical duties in the Flight Support Branch of
the Astronaut Office. He will fly on the crew of STS-89
(Shuttle Endeavour to Space Station Mir) and will log
over 211 hours in space in 1998. Lt. Colonel Anderson
will be assigned to the crew of STS-107 (Shuttle Columbia)
and will join the ancestors when Columbia explodes during
re-entry on February 1, 2003.

1965 - The Congress of Racial Equality announces that its national
director, Dr. James Farmer, would resign on March 1.

2006 - James Brown, the dynamic "Godfather of Soul," whose
revolutionary rhythms, rough voice and flashing footwork
influenced generations of musicians from rock to rap,
joined the ancestors early Christmas morning at the age of
73. He had been hospitalized with pneumonia at Emory
Crawford Long Hospital on 12/24 and succumbed to heart
failure around 1:45 a.m. He was one of the major musical
influences of the past 50 years. From Mick Jagger to
Michael Jackson, David Bowie to Public Enemy, his rapid-
footed dancing, hard-charging beats and heartfelt yet
often unintelligible vocals changed the musical landscape.



Ourstory 1/1
***********************************************************************
* The Nguzo Saba - The seven principles of Kwanzaa - Principle for *
* Day #7 - Imani (ee-MAH-nee) Faith: To believe with all our hearts *
* in our parents, our teachers, our leaders, our people and the *
* righteousness and victory of our struggle. *
* http://www.endarkenment.com/kwanzaa/ *
***********************************************************************

1788 - The Quakers in Pennsylvania emancipate their slaves.

1804 – The island of Haiti became the first African-led nation in the world, as a result of revolution and achieved independence from France after the only successful slave rebellion in world history.

1808 - The slave trade is outlawed in the United States. This stopped
the legal importation of African slaves, but did not stop
domestic trading in slaves.

1831 - William Lloyd Garrison publishes the first issue of "The
Liberator" in Boston, Massachusetts. The newspaper will become
a major influence in the movement to abolish slavery in the
United States.

1937 – Lou Stovall, artist and master printmaker is born in Athens, GA

1856 - Bridget "Biddy" Mason and her children are granted their freedom
by the California courts. After gaining her freedom, she will
move to Los Angeles, where she will become a major landowner and
be known for her philanthropy to the poor.

1863 - President Abraham Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation,
declaring freedom for slaves living in the states that joined
the rebellion that will become known as the Civil War.

1900 - The British protectorates of Northern & Southern Nigeria are
established.

1916 - The first issue of the "Journal of Negro History" is published
with Carter G. Woodson as editor. Since then, several other journals have explored the Global black experience, such as the Journal of African Civilizations.

1956 - Sudan becomes independent.

1958 – Legendary hip hop DJ pioneer Grandmaster Flash was born in Bridgetown, Barbados

1959 - Edmonia Lewis was born to a Chippewa mother and African father...given the indian name Wildfire. In the fall of 1859 she admiting in Oberlin College, and later studied sculpting privately with Edmund Brackett. Lewis became known for her busts of famous figures as Abraham Lincoln, Longfellow and John Brown. Her Staue 'The Death of Cleopatra', received critical acclaim. Most popular was her "Forever Free..depicting African American man and woman removing their shackles.

1959 - Chad becomes an autonomous republic within the French Community.

1960 - Cameroon gains independence from France.

1962 - Rwanda is granted internal self-government by Belgium.

1964 - The Federation of Rhodesia & Nyasaland is dissolved.

1973 - The West African Economic Community is formed with Benin, Ivory
Coast, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal, and Upper Volta as
members.

1986 - Aruba becomes an independent part of Kingdom of the Netherlands.

1990 - David Dinkins is sworn in as first African American mayor of
New York City.

1997 - The former prison for Nelson Mandela and many other South Africans is turned in to a museum at Robben Island.

1997 - Kofi Annan of Ghana becomes first black secretary of United Nations.

2005 - Shirley Chisholm, an advocate for minority rights who became the
first African American woman elected to Congress and later the
first African American to seek a major party's nomination for
the U.S. presidency, joins the ancestors at the age of 80. The
Rev. Jesse Jackson calls her a "woman of great courage."

 

THIS IS NOW OUR STORY OF OUR PRESIDENT OBAMA!!!

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

Statement by the President on H.R. 1540

Today I have signed into law H.R. 1540, the "National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012." I have signed the Act chiefly because it authorizes funding for the defense of the United States and its interests abroad, crucial services for service members and their families, and vital national security programs that must be renewed. In hundreds of separate sections totaling over 500 pages, the Act also contains critical Administration initiatives to control the spiraling health care costs of the Department of Defense (DoD), to develop counterterrorism initiatives abroad, to build the security capacity of key partners, to modernize the force, and to boost the efficiency and effectiveness of military operations worldwide.

The fact that I support this bill as a whole does not mean I agree with everything in it. In particular, I have signed this bill despite having serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists. Over the last several years, my Administration has developed an effective, sustainable framework for the detention, interrogation and trial of suspected terrorists that allows us to maximize both our ability to collect intelligence and to incapacitate dangerous individuals in rapidly developing situations, and the results we have achieved are undeniable. Our success against al-Qa'ida and its affiliates and adherents has derived in significant measure from providing our counterterrorism professionals with the clarity and flexibility they need to adapt to changing circumstances and to utilize whichever authorities best protect the American people, and our accomplishments have respected the values that make our country an example for the world.

Against that record of success, some in Congress continue to insist upon restricting the options available to our counterterrorism professionals and interfering with the very operations that have kept us safe. My Administration has consistently opposed such measures. Ultimately, I decided to sign this bill not only because of the critically important services it provides for our forces and their families and the national security programs it authorizes, but also because the Congress revised provisions that otherwise would have jeopardized the safety, security, and liberty of the American people. Moving forward, my Administration will interpret and implement the provisions described below in a manner that best preserves the flexibility on which our safety depends and upholds the values on which this country was founded.

Section 1021 affirms the executive branch's authority to detain persons covered by the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note). This section breaks no new ground and is unnecessary. The authority it describes was included in the 2001 AUMF, as recognized by the Supreme Court and confirmed through lower court decisions since then. Two critical limitations in section 1021 confirm that it solely codifies established authorities. First, under section 1021(d), the bill does not "limit or expand the authority of the President or the scope of the Authorization for Use of Military Force." Second, under section 1021(e), the bill may not be construed to affect any "existing law or authorities relating to the detention of United States citizens, lawful resident aliens of the United States, or any other persons who are captured or arrested in the United States." My Administration strongly supported the inclusion of these limitations in order to make clear beyond doubt that the legislation does nothing more than confirm authorities that the Federal courts have recognized as lawful under the 2001 AUMF. Moreover, I want to clarify that my Administration will not authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American citizens. Indeed, I believe that doing so would break with our most important traditions and values as a Nation. My Administration will interpret section 1021 in a manner that ensures that any detention it authorizes complies with the Constitution, the laws of war, and all other applicable law.

Section 1022 seeks to require military custody for a narrow category of non-citizen detainees who are "captured in the course of hostilities authorized by the Authorization for Use of Military Force." This section is ill-conceived and will do nothing to improve the security of the United States. The executive branch already has the authority to detain in military custody those members of al-Qa'ida who are captured in the course of hostilities authorized by the AUMF, and as Commander in Chief I have directed the military to do so where appropriate. I reject any approach that would mandate military custody where law enforcement provides the best method of incapacitating a terrorist threat. While section 1022 is unnecessary and has the potential to create uncertainty, I have signed the bill because I believe that this section can be interpreted and applied in a manner that avoids undue harm to our current operations.

I have concluded that section 1022 provides the minimally acceptable amount of flexibility to protect national security. Specifically, I have signed this bill on the understanding that section 1022 provides the executive branch with broad authority to determine how best to implement it, and with the full and unencumbered ability to waive any military custody requirement, including the option of waiving appropriate categories of cases when doing so is in the national security interests of the United States. As my Administration has made clear, the only responsible way to combat the threat al-Qa'ida poses is to remain relentlessly practical, guided by the factual and legal complexities of each case and the relative strengths and weaknesses of each system. Otherwise, investigations could be compromised, our authorities to hold dangerous individuals could be jeopardized, and intelligence could be lost. I will not tolerate that result, and under no circumstances will my Administration accept or adhere to a rigid across-the-board requirement for military detention. I will therefore interpret and implement section 1022 in the manner that best preserves the same flexible approach that has served us so well for the past 3 years and that protects the ability of law enforcement professionals to obtain the evidence and cooperation they need to protect the Nation.

My Administration will design the implementation procedures authorized by section 1022(c) to provide the maximum measure of flexibility and clarity to our counterterrorism professionals permissible under law. And I will exercise all of my constitutional authorities as Chief Executive and Commander in Chief if those procedures fall short, including but not limited to seeking the revision or repeal of provisions should they prove to be unworkable.

Sections 1023-1025 needlessly interfere with the executive branch's processes for reviewing the status of detainees. Going forward, consistent with congressional intent as detailed in the Conference Report, my Administration will interpret section 1024 as granting the Secretary of Defense broad discretion to determine what detainee status determinations in Afghanistan are subject to the requirements of this section.

Sections 1026-1028 continue unwise funding restrictions that curtail options available to the executive branch. Section 1027 renews the bar against using appropriated funds for fiscal year 2012 to transfer Guantanamo detainees into the United States for any purpose. I continue to oppose this provision, which intrudes upon critical executive branch authority to determine when and where to prosecute Guantanamo detainees, based on the facts and the circumstances of each case and our national security interests. For decades, Republican and Democratic administrations have successfully prosecuted hundreds of terrorists in Federal court. Those prosecutions are a legitimate, effective, and powerful tool in our efforts to protect the Nation. Removing that tool from the executive branch does not serve our national security. Moreover, this intrusion would, under certain circumstances, violate constitutional separation of powers principles.

Section 1028 modifies but fundamentally maintains unwarranted restrictions on the executive branch's authority to transfer detainees to a foreign country. This hinders the executive's ability to carry out its military, national security, and foreign relations activities and like section 1027, would, under certain circumstances, violate constitutional separation of powers principles. The executive branch must have the flexibility to act swiftly in conducting negotiations with foreign countries regarding the circumstances of detainee transfers. In the event that the statutory restrictions in sections 1027 and 1028 operate in a manner that violates constitutional separation of powers principles, my Administration will interpret them to avoid the constitutional conflict.

Section 1029 requires that the Attorney General consult with the Director of National Intelligence and Secretary of Defense prior to filing criminal charges against or seeking an indictment of certain individuals. I sign this based on the understanding that apart from detainees held by the military outside of the United States under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, the provision applies only to those individuals who have been determined to be covered persons under section 1022 before the Justice Department files charges or seeks an indictment. Notwithstanding that limitation, this provision represents an intrusion into the functions and prerogatives of the Department of Justice and offends the longstanding legal tradition that decisions regarding criminal prosecutions should be vested with the Attorney General free from outside interference. Moreover, section 1029 could impede flexibility and hinder exigent operational judgments in a manner that damages our security. My Administration will interpret and implement section 1029 in a manner that preserves the operational flexibility of our counterterrorism and law enforcement professionals, limits delays in the investigative process, ensures that critical executive branch functions are not inhibited, and preserves the integrity and independence of the Department of Justice.

Other provisions in this bill above could interfere with my constitutional foreign affairs powers. Section 1244 requires the President to submit a report to the Congress 60 days prior to sharing any U.S. classified ballistic missile defense information with Russia. Section 1244 further specifies that this report include a detailed description of the classified information to be provided. While my Administration intends to keep the Congress fully informed of the status of U.S. efforts to cooperate with the Russian Federation on ballistic missile defense, my Administration will also interpret and implement section 1244 in a manner that does not interfere with the President's constitutional authority to conduct foreign affairs and avoids the undue disclosure of sensitive diplomatic communications. Other sections pose similar problems. Sections 1231, 1240, 1241, and 1242 could be read to require the disclosure of sensitive diplomatic communications and national security secrets; and sections 1235, 1242, and 1245 would interfere with my constitutional authority to conduct foreign relations by directing the Executive to take certain positions in negotiations or discussions with foreign governments. Like section 1244, should any application of these provisions conflict with my constitutional authorities, I will treat the provisions as non-binding.

My Administration has worked tirelessly to reform or remove the provisions described above in order to facilitate the enactment of this vital legislation, but certain provisions remain concerning. My Administration will aggressively seek to mitigate those concerns through the design of implementation procedures and other authorities available to me as Chief Executive and Commander in Chief, will oppose any attempt to extend or expand them in the future, and will seek the repeal of any provisions that undermine the policies and values that have guided my Administration throughout my time in office.

BARACK OBAMA


THE WHITE HOUSE,
December 31, 2011.

 

I'M NOT A DEMOCROOK OR RETHUGLICAN, NOR AM I A CONSPIRACY THEORIST. I'M JUST DISSEMINATING INFO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPrqIoAYuFw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJhYhGoNLuo

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/12/31/statement-pre...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEj89sedJ-Q

f dat! He not MY president, can't stand that puppet

Ourstory 1/6

1773 - "Felix," a Boston slave, and others petition Massachusetts
Governor Hutchinson for their freedom. It is the first of
a record eight similar petitions filed during the
Revolutionary War.

1831 - The World Anti-Slavery Convention opens in London, England.

1832 - William Lloyd Garrison founds the New England Anti-Slavery
Society at the African Meeting House in Boston,
Massachusetts, where he issues the society's "Declaration
of Sentiments" from the Meeting House pulpit.

1882 - Thomas Boyne receives the Congressional Medal of Honor for
bravery in two New Mexico battles while a sergeant in Troop
C, 9th U.S. Calvary.

1906 - Benedict Wallet Vilakazi is born in South Africa. He will
become a pre-apartheid Zulu poet, novelist, and educator.
In 1946, he will become the first Black South African to
receive a Ph.D. He will become the first Black South African
to teach white South Africans at the university level. He
will join the ancestors on October 26, 1947 after succumbing
to meningitis.

1937 - Doris Payne is born in Bronx, New York. She will become a
rhythm and blues singer better known as Doris Troy and best
known for her song "Just One Look." She will also be known
as "Mama Soul." "Mama, I Want To Sing" will be a stage
musical based on her life, and co-written with her sister,
Vy. It will run for 1,500 performances at the Heckscher
Theatre in Harlem. She will play the part of her own mother,
Geraldine. She will join the ancestors on February 16, 2004,
succumbing to emphysema.

1961 - The "jail-in" movement starts in Rock Hill, S.C. when arrested students demand jail rather than fines.

1968 - John Daniel Singleton is born in Los Angeles, California.
He will become an Academy Award-nominated film director,
screenwriter, and producer. His movies will depict his
native South Los Angeles with both its sweet and violent
sides given equal consideration. He will attend Pasadena
City College and the University of Southern California.
He will receive many distinctions, beginning during his
time as an undergraduate screenwriter at the University
of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts,
including nominations for Best Screenplay and Director for
"Boyz N the Hood." He will be the youngest person ever
nominated for Best Director at the 1991 Academy Awards for
"Boyz N the Hood" and the first (and, to date, the only)
African American to be nominated for the award.

1971 - Cecil A. Partee is elected president pro tem of the Illinois
State Senate. He is the first African American to hold this
position.

1971 – The Dance Theater of Harlem, an All-African American ballet company, was founded, 1971

1984 - Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Robert N.C. Nix, Jr., is
inaugurated as Chief Justice. The Philadelphia native,
former deputy attorney general of the state, and thirteen-
year veteran of the Court, is the first African American to
head a state Supreme Court.

1989 - Elizabeth Koontz joins the ancestors at the age of 69. She
was a noted educator and the first African American
president of the National Education Association. She also
had been director of the Women's Bureau in the U.S.
Department of Labor.

1993 - Jazz great, John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie, joins the ancestors
in Englewood, New Jersey at the age of 76. He had played
actively until early 1992.

1996 – Recycling Black Dollars, an organization of black businesses, campaigns for “Change Bank Day” to benefit black-owned financial institutions.

2003 - Mamie Till Mobley, mother of lynched Emmett Till dies at age 81. Her insistance that her son's casket remain open helped spur the civil rights movement.



bishop omega said:

THIS IS NOW OUR STORY OF OUR PRESIDENT OBAMA!!!

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

Statement by the President on H.R. 1540

Today I have signed into law H.R. 1540, the "National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012." I have signed the Act chiefly because it authorizes funding for the defense of the United States and its interests abroad, crucial services for service members and their families, and vital national security programs that must be renewed. In hundreds of separate sections totaling over 500 pages, the Act also contains critical Administration initiatives to control the spiraling health care costs of the Department of Defense (DoD), to develop counterterrorism initiatives abroad, to build the security capacity of key partners, to modernize the force, and to boost the efficiency and effectiveness of military operations worldwide.

The fact that I support this bill as a whole does not mean I agree with everything in it. In particular, I have signed this bill despite having serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists. Over the last several years, my Administration has developed an effective, sustainable framework for the detention, interrogation and trial of suspected terrorists that allows us to maximize both our ability to collect intelligence and to incapacitate dangerous individuals in rapidly developing situations, and the results we have achieved are undeniable. Our success against al-Qa'ida and its affiliates and adherents has derived in significant measure from providing our counterterrorism professionals with the clarity and flexibility they need to adapt to changing circumstances and to utilize whichever authorities best protect the American people, and our accomplishments have respected the values that make our country an example for the world.

Against that record of success, some in Congress continue to insist upon restricting the options available to our counterterrorism professionals and interfering with the very operations that have kept us safe. My Administration has consistently opposed such measures. Ultimately, I decided to sign this bill not only because of the critically important services it provides for our forces and their families and the national security programs it authorizes, but also because the Congress revised provisions that otherwise would have jeopardized the safety, security, and liberty of the American people. Moving forward, my Administration will interpret and implement the provisions described below in a manner that best preserves the flexibility on which our safety depends and upholds the values on which this country was founded.

Section 1021 affirms the executive branch's authority to detain persons covered by the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note). This section breaks no new ground and is unnecessary. The authority it describes was included in the 2001 AUMF, as recognized by the Supreme Court and confirmed through lower court decisions since then. Two critical limitations in section 1021 confirm that it solely codifies established authorities. First, under section 1021(d), the bill does not "limit or expand the authority of the President or the scope of the Authorization for Use of Military Force." Second, under section 1021(e), the bill may not be construed to affect any "existing law or authorities relating to the detention of United States citizens, lawful resident aliens of the United States, or any other persons who are captured or arrested in the United States." My Administration strongly supported the inclusion of these limitations in order to make clear beyond doubt that the legislation does nothing more than confirm authorities that the Federal courts have recognized as lawful under the 2001 AUMF. Moreover, I want to clarify that my Administration will not authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American citizens. Indeed, I believe that doing so would break with our most important traditions and values as a Nation. My Administration will interpret section 1021 in a manner that ensures that any detention it authorizes complies with the Constitution, the laws of war, and all other applicable law.

Section 1022 seeks to require military custody for a narrow category of non-citizen detainees who are "captured in the course of hostilities authorized by the Authorization for Use of Military Force." This section is ill-conceived and will do nothing to improve the security of the United States. The executive branch already has the authority to detain in military custody those members of al-Qa'ida who are captured in the course of hostilities authorized by the AUMF, and as Commander in Chief I have directed the military to do so where appropriate. I reject any approach that would mandate military custody where law enforcement provides the best method of incapacitating a terrorist threat. While section 1022 is unnecessary and has the potential to create uncertainty, I have signed the bill because I believe that this section can be interpreted and applied in a manner that avoids undue harm to our current operations.

I have concluded that section 1022 provides the minimally acceptable amount of flexibility to protect national security. Specifically, I have signed this bill on the understanding that section 1022 provides the executive branch with broad authority to determine how best to implement it, and with the full and unencumbered ability to waive any military custody requirement, including the option of waiving appropriate categories of cases when doing so is in the national security interests of the United States. As my Administration has made clear, the only responsible way to combat the threat al-Qa'ida poses is to remain relentlessly practical, guided by the factual and legal complexities of each case and the relative strengths and weaknesses of each system. Otherwise, investigations could be compromised, our authorities to hold dangerous individuals could be jeopardized, and intelligence could be lost. I will not tolerate that result, and under no circumstances will my Administration accept or adhere to a rigid across-the-board requirement for military detention. I will therefore interpret and implement section 1022 in the manner that best preserves the same flexible approach that has served us so well for the past 3 years and that protects the ability of law enforcement professionals to obtain the evidence and cooperation they need to protect the Nation.

My Administration will design the implementation procedures authorized by section 1022(c) to provide the maximum measure of flexibility and clarity to our counterterrorism professionals permissible under law. And I will exercise all of my constitutional authorities as Chief Executive and Commander in Chief if those procedures fall short, including but not limited to seeking the revision or repeal of provisions should they prove to be unworkable.

Sections 1023-1025 needlessly interfere with the executive branch's processes for reviewing the status of detainees. Going forward, consistent with congressional intent as detailed in the Conference Report, my Administration will interpret section 1024 as granting the Secretary of Defense broad discretion to determine what detainee status determinations in Afghanistan are subject to the requirements of this section.

Sections 1026-1028 continue unwise funding restrictions that curtail options available to the executive branch. Section 1027 renews the bar against using appropriated funds for fiscal year 2012 to transfer Guantanamo detainees into the United States for any purpose. I continue to oppose this provision, which intrudes upon critical executive branch authority to determine when and where to prosecute Guantanamo detainees, based on the facts and the circumstances of each case and our national security interests. For decades, Republican and Democratic administrations have successfully prosecuted hundreds of terrorists in Federal court. Those prosecutions are a legitimate, effective, and powerful tool in our efforts to protect the Nation. Removing that tool from the executive branch does not serve our national security. Moreover, this intrusion would, under certain circumstances, violate constitutional separation of powers principles.

Section 1028 modifies but fundamentally maintains unwarranted restrictions on the executive branch's authority to transfer detainees to a foreign country. This hinders the executive's ability to carry out its military, national security, and foreign relations activities and like section 1027, would, under certain circumstances, violate constitutional separation of powers principles. The executive branch must have the flexibility to act swiftly in conducting negotiations with foreign countries regarding the circumstances of detainee transfers. In the event that the statutory restrictions in sections 1027 and 1028 operate in a manner that violates constitutional separation of powers principles, my Administration will interpret them to avoid the constitutional conflict.

Section 1029 requires that the Attorney General consult with the Director of National Intelligence and Secretary of Defense prior to filing criminal charges against or seeking an indictment of certain individuals. I sign this based on the understanding that apart from detainees held by the military outside of the United States under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, the provision applies only to those individuals who have been determined to be covered persons under section 1022 before the Justice Department files charges or seeks an indictment. Notwithstanding that limitation, this provision represents an intrusion into the functions and prerogatives of the Department of Justice and offends the longstanding legal tradition that decisions regarding criminal prosecutions should be vested with the Attorney General free from outside interference. Moreover, section 1029 could impede flexibility and hinder exigent operational judgments in a manner that damages our security. My Administration will interpret and implement section 1029 in a manner that preserves the operational flexibility of our counterterrorism and law enforcement professionals, limits delays in the investigative process, ensures that critical executive branch functions are not inhibited, and preserves the integrity and independence of the Department of Justice.

Other provisions in this bill above could interfere with my constitutional foreign affairs powers. Section 1244 requires the President to submit a report to the Congress 60 days prior to sharing any U.S. classified ballistic missile defense information with Russia. Section 1244 further specifies that this report include a detailed description of the classified information to be provided. While my Administration intends to keep the Congress fully informed of the status of U.S. efforts to cooperate with the Russian Federation on ballistic missile defense, my Administration will also interpret and implement section 1244 in a manner that does not interfere with the President's constitutional authority to conduct foreign affairs and avoids the undue disclosure of sensitive diplomatic communications. Other sections pose similar problems. Sections 1231, 1240, 1241, and 1242 could be read to require the disclosure of sensitive diplomatic communications and national security secrets; and sections 1235, 1242, and 1245 would interfere with my constitutional authority to conduct foreign relations by directing the Executive to take certain positions in negotiations or discussions with foreign governments. Like section 1244, should any application of these provisions conflict with my constitutional authorities, I will treat the provisions as non-binding.

My Administration has worked tirelessly to reform or remove the provisions described above in order to facilitate the enactment of this vital legislation, but certain provisions remain concerning. My Administration will aggressively seek to mitigate those concerns through the design of implementation procedures and other authorities available to me as Chief Executive and Commander in Chief, will oppose any attempt to extend or expand them in the future, and will seek the repeal of any provisions that undermine the policies and values that have guided my Administration throughout my time in office.

BARACK OBAMA


THE WHITE HOUSE,
December 31, 2011.

 

I'M NOT A DEMOCROOK OR RETHUGLICAN, NOR AM I A CONSPIRACY THEORIST. I'M JUST DISSEMINATING INFO.

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1/7

1822 - A colony of free African Americans sent to Africa by the
       American Colonization Society, is established on the west
       coast of Africa. It is the beginning of the African American
       colonization of Liberia. This colony will become the
       independent nation of Liberia in 1847.

1868 - The Mississippi constitutional convention convenes in Jackson.
       It is attended by seventeen African Americans and eighty-three
       whites.

1868 - The Arkansas constitutional convention convenes in Little Rock.
       It is attended by eight African Americans and forty-three
       whites.

1890 - William B. Purvis is awarded patent #419,065 for the fountain
       pen.

1891 - Zora Neale Hurston, who will become a brilliant folklorist,
       novelist, and short story writer, is born in Notasulga,
       Alabama. For reasons known only to her, she will claim 1901 as
       her birth year and the all-Black town of Eatonville, Florida as
       her birthplace. She will be one of the more influential writers
       of the Harlem Renaissance, known for her novel "Their Eyes Were
       Watching God" and her folklore collections, including "Of Mules
       and Men." She will join the ancestors on January 28, 1960.

1892 - A mine explosion kills 100 in Krebs, Oklahoma.  African
       Americans trying to help rescue white survivors, are driven
       away at gunpoint.

1950 - The James Weldon Johnson Collection officially opens at Yale
       University.  Established in 1941 through a gift by Grace Nail
       Johnson, widow of the famed author, diplomat and NAACP
       official, the collection will eventually include the papers of
       Johnson, Langston Hughes, W.E.B. Dubois, Richard Wright, Jean
       Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, and many other writers of the
       Harlem Renaissance.

1964 - The Bahamas achieve internal self-government & cabinet level
       responsibility.

1986 - White teens in Howard Beach chased Michael Griffith, an African-American youth, onto a freeway where he was hit by a motorist. Griffith died from his injuries setting off a wave of protests and racial tensions in New York.

1997 – Former South African president Pieter W. Botha is prosecuted for refusing to appear before the nation’s truth commission.

2002 - Shirley Franklin is sworn in as the first African American Mayor of Atlanta and the only African American female mayor of a major American city.

2003 - Thurgood Marshall, a famed civil rights lawyer and U.S. Supreme
       Court Justice, is honored by the United States Postal Service
       with the 26th stamp issuance in the Black Heritage
       Commemorative Series.

Black people are the Original people of the planet. DNA evidence proves that all humans today came from a group of Blacks who traveled and settled the globe 50,000 years ago.

All of the elements of civilization first began in Africa, including religion, art, science, government, mining, writing, music, mathematics, architecture, engineering, and agriculture.

Before Greece, Rome or Europe was ever established, there were multiple Black civilizations throughout the world, already thousands of years old.

Blacks started compulsory education. Even stone workers in ancient Egypt learned to read, and education was made mandatory by the Moors, while 90% of Europe was illiterate, including the royalty.

Blacks started libraries. The ancient Egyptians created paper about 4000 BC, which library storage easier. Over 700,000 books were in the libraries of Egypt before Homer, the father of Western literature, was even born.

The earliest mathematical device found to date is the Lebombo bone of southern Africa. It is about 37,000 years old and appears to be a lunar calendar.

For more jewels like this cop the 365 Days of REAL Black History calendar by Supreme Design Publishing
http://www.supremedesignonline.com/blackhistory365.html

1/8

1811 - A slave rebellion begins 35 miles outside of New Orleans,
       Louisiana.  U.S. troops will be called upon to put down the
       uprising of over 400 slaves, which will last three days.

1837 - Fanny M. Jackson is born a slave in Washington, DC.  She will
       become the first African American woman college graduate in
       the United States when she graduates from Oberlin College in
       1865. After graduation, she will become a teacher at the
       Institute for Colored Youths in Philadelphia.  In 1869, she
       will become the first African American woman to head an
       institution of higher learning when she is made Principal of
       the Institute.  In the fall of 1881, Fanny will marry the Rev.
       Levi Jenkins Coppin, a minister of the African Methodist
       Episcopal Church. The marriage will open a wealth of
       missionary opportunities for Fanny. When her husband is made
       Bishop of Cape Town, South Africa, Fanny will accompany him
       and travel thousands of miles organizing mission societies.
       She will join the ancestors on January 21, 1913 in
       Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1926, a facility for teacher
       training in Baltimore, Maryland will be named Fanny Jackson
       Coppin Normal School in her honor.  The school is known today
       as Coppin State University.

1867 - Overriding President Andrew Johnson's veto, Congress passes
       legislation giving African Americans in the District of
       Columbia the right to the vote.

1912 - The African National Congress, in South Africa, is formed.

1975 - The state-owned Alabama Educational Television Commission has
       its application for license renewal denied by the Federal
       Communications Commission because of racial discrimination
       against African Americans in employment and programming. 

Did you know...

Black people even pioneered fishing and sailing. 90,000 year old harpoons and other tools found in northeastern Zaire. Even before that, Blacks traveled the seas to populate the Pacific Islands.

Blacks started astronomy. Ruins of a 300 BC astronomical observatory were found at Namoratunga in Kenya. A stone observatory over 5,000 years old was found west of Egypt.
Black people were the first to engage in mining. A 43,000 year old hematite mine was found in Swaziland at Bomvu Ridge.

Black people were the first to develop agriculture. There are 12,000 year old tools and evidence of crop cultivation in Egypt’s Western Desert. Other agricultural sites in Egypt have been dated to 18,000 BC.

There’s nothing new under the sun. Most modern inventions, techniques, cultural practices and ideas can be traced back to ancient origins. And when you go back to the original of all things, you find Black people.

Black people developed the first martial arts. One of the earliest papyrus scrolls from Egypt shows a system of attacks and takedowns that has yet to be further explored.
Blacks developed the first economic systems. Cowrie shells are brightly colored shells that served as one of the earliest forms of money in ancient Africa, predating gold coins (which were also developed by Blacks)
For more jewels like this cop the 365 Days of REAL Black History calendar by Supreme Design Publishing
http://supremedesignonline.com/blackhistory365.html

Ourstory 1/9

1866 - Fisk College is established in Nashville, Tennessee. Rust
College is established in Holly Springs, Mississippi.
Lincoln University is established in Jefferson City,
Missouri.

1901 - Edward Mitchell Bannister joins the ancestors in Providence,
Rhode Island. Challenged to become an artist after reading a
newspaper article deriding African Americans' ability to
produce art, he disproved that statement throughout a
distinguished art career.

1906 - Poet and author, Paul Laurence Dunbar, joins the ancestors
after succumbing to tuberculosis. Dunbar was so talented and
versatile that he succeeded in two worlds. He was so adept
at writing verse in Black English that he became known as the
"poet of his people," while also cultivating a white audience
that appreciated the brilliance and value of his work.
"Majors and Minors" (1895), Dunbar's second collection of
verse, was a remarkable work containing some of his best poems
in both Black and standard English. When the country's
reigning literary critic, William Dean Howells reviewed
"Majors and Minors" favorably, Dunbar became famous. And
Howells' introduction in "Lyric of Lowly Life" (1896) helped
make Dunbar the most popular African American writer in
America at the time.

1922 - Ahmed Sekou Toure, first president of Guinea, born.

1935 - Earl G. Graves is born in Brooklyn, New York. He will become
president and chief executive officer of Earl G. Graves, Ltd.,
the publisher of "Black Enterprise" magazine, a successful
entrepreneur, and one of the strongest advocates for
African American business.

1946 - Lyric poet, Countee Cullen joins the ancestors in New York City
at the age of 42. His several volumes of poetry include
"Color" (1925); "Copper Sun" (1927); "The Black Christ" (1929);
and "On These I Stand" (published posthumously, 1947), his
selection of poems by which he wished to be remembered. Cullen
also wrote a novel dealing with life in Harlem, "One Way to
Heaven" (1931), and a children's book, "The Lost Zoo" (1940).

1967 - The Georgia legislature, bowing to legal decisions and national
pressure, seats state Representative Julian Bond, a critic of
the Vietnam War.

1970 - After 140 years of unofficial racial discrimination, the Mormon
Church issues an official statement declaring that Blacks were
not yet to receive the priesthood "for reasons which we
believe are known to God, but which He has not made fully
known to man."

1989 - Time, Inc. agrees to sell NYT Cable for $420 million to Comcast
Corporation, Lenfest Communications, and an investment group
led by African American entrepreneur J. Bruce Llewellyn. It is
the largest cable TV acquisition by an African American.

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